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Documentary /

by Stallabrass, Julian [editor of compilation.].
Type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Documents of contemporary art series: Publisher: London : Whitechapel Gallery ; Cambridge, Massachusetts : The MIT Press, 2013Description: 239 pages ; 21 cm.ISBN: 9780262518291 (pbk. : alk. paper); 0262518295 (pbk. : alk. paper).Subject(s): Documentary mass media and the arts | Arts, Modern -- 20th century | Arts, Modern -- 21st century
Contents:
Machine generated contents note: Origins And Definitions -- Conventions -- Does Documentary Exist? -- Photojournalism And Documentary: For, Against And Beyond -- Active And Passive Spectators -- The Limits Of The Visible -- Documentary Fictions -- Commitment.
Summary: Documentary has undergone a marked revival in recent art, following a long period in which it was a denigrated and unfashionable practice. This has in part been led by the exhibition of photographic and video work on political issues at 'Documenta' and numerous biennials and, since the turn of the century, issues of injustice, violence and trauma in increasing zones of conflict. Aesthetically, documentary is now one of the most prominent modes of art-making, in part assisted by the linked transformation and recuperation of photography and video by the gallery and museum world. Unsurprisingly, this development, along with the close attention paid to photojournalism and mainstream documentary-making in a time of crisis, has been accompanied by a rich strain of theoretical and historical writing on documentary.
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Includes bibliographical references (pages 230-233) and index.

Machine generated contents note: Origins And Definitions -- Conventions -- Does Documentary Exist? -- Photojournalism And Documentary: For, Against And Beyond -- Active And Passive Spectators -- The Limits Of The Visible -- Documentary Fictions -- Commitment.

Documentary has undergone a marked revival in recent art, following a long period in which it was a denigrated and unfashionable practice. This has in part been led by the exhibition of photographic and video work on political issues at 'Documenta' and numerous biennials and, since the turn of the century, issues of injustice, violence and trauma in increasing zones of conflict. Aesthetically, documentary is now one of the most prominent modes of art-making, in part assisted by the linked transformation and recuperation of photography and video by the gallery and museum world. Unsurprisingly, this development, along with the close attention paid to photojournalism and mainstream documentary-making in a time of crisis, has been accompanied by a rich strain of theoretical and historical writing on documentary.

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