Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Art in Europe, 1700-1830 : a history of the visual arts in an era of unprecedented urban economic growth /

by Craske, Matthew.
Type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Oxford history of art: Publisher: Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 1997Description: 320 p. : ill. (some col.), col. map ; 25 cm.ISBN: 0192842463 (hb : acid-free paper); 0192842064 (pbk. : acid-free paper).Subject(s): Art, European -- 17th century | Art, European | Art, European -- 18th century | Art, European -- 19th centuryOnline resources: Publisher description | Contributor biographical information
Contents:
Ch. 1. Beyond the Useful and Agreeable Man -- Ch. 2. 'Commerce and politics connect all parts of the world' -- Ch. 3. 'And 'tis in vain to find faults in the arts of deceiving ...' -- Ch. 4. 'First Freedom, and then Glory ...'.
Summary: Taking a critical view of such conventional categorizations as the 'Rococo', the 'Neo-Classical', and the 'Romantic', Matthew Craske creates a totally new and vivid picture of eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century art in Europe. He engages with crucial thematic issues such as changes in 'taste' and 'manners' and the impact of enlightenment notions of progress. At the same time he goes well beyond the usual geographical limits of surveys to take in St Petersburg, Copenhagen, Warsaw, and Madrid. The result is a refreshingly holistic survey which sets the art of the period firmly in its social history. List(s) this item appears in: Art History and Theory 1.2
Tags from this library:
No tags from this library for this title.
Log in to add tags.
    average rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Item type Location Collection Call number Copy Status Date due Barcode Item holds
High Demand High Demand High demand Non-fiction HI CRA 1997 (Browse shelf) 1 Available 2013-1117
High Demand High Demand
High demand
Non-fiction HI 70 (Browse shelf) 1 Lost 2013-1116
Total holds: 0

Includes bibliographical references (p. 291-301) and index.

Ch. 1. Beyond the Useful and Agreeable Man -- Ch. 2. 'Commerce and politics connect all parts of the world' -- Ch. 3. 'And 'tis in vain to find faults in the arts of deceiving ...' -- Ch. 4. 'First Freedom, and then Glory ...'.

Taking a critical view of such conventional categorizations as the 'Rococo', the 'Neo-Classical', and the 'Romantic', Matthew Craske creates a totally new and vivid picture of eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century art in Europe. He engages with crucial thematic issues such as changes in 'taste' and 'manners' and the impact of enlightenment notions of progress. At the same time he goes well beyond the usual geographical limits of surveys to take in St Petersburg, Copenhagen, Warsaw, and Madrid. The result is a refreshingly holistic survey which sets the art of the period firmly in its social history.

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.