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Aboriginal art /

by Morphy, Howard [author].
Type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Art ideas: Edition: Reprinted edition.Description: 447 pages : illustrations (chiefly color), maps ; 22 cm.ISBN: 0714837520.Subject(s): Aboriginal Australians -- Material culture | Painting, Aboriginal Australian | Painting, Australian -- Aboriginal artists | Aborigines, Australian -- Art | Artists, Aboriginal Australian | Australian aborigines -- Art | Art, Australian aboriginal | Art, Australian -- Aboriginal artists | Aboriginal Australians -- Art | Art - Sculpture | Art - Artists | Indigenous knowledge - World view | Art - Art motifs | Art - Painting - Bark | Art - Rock art | Art - Urban art | Art - Tourist art | Art, Aboriginal Australian | Art -- Art motifs | Art -- Painting -- Bark | Art -- Sculpture | Art -- Artists | Indigenous knowledge -- World view | Art | Art -- Rock art | Art -- Urban art | Art, Aboriginal Australian | Art -- Tourist art | Art, Aboriginal Australian | Religion | Ceremonies | Aboriginal art | Aboriginal culture | History
Contents:
A journey to recognition: the 'discovery' of Aboriginal art -- A lasting record: rock art as history -- Foundations: art, religion and the Dreaming -- A totemic landscape: art, maps and people -- The kinship of art: art and society -- The power of art: art, ritual and aesthetics -- Engaging the other: art and the survival of Aboriginal society -- Transformations: the contemporary art of central Australia -- Settler Australia: the survival of art in adversity -- Documents of change: the art of William Barak and Tommy McRae -- Contemporary developments: Aboriginal art and the avant-garde.
Summary: For thousands of years Australian Aborigines have been making art. A manifestation of the creative forces of the Dreamtime, art is also a means of expressing individual and group identity. But while Aboriginal art keeps the past alive and maintains its relevance to the present, it also responds to new circumstances. Aboriginal art cannot be divorced from the process of European colonization that began in earnest in 1788.Summary: In this book, Howard Morphy, one of the foremost authorities in this field, surveys the great variety of Aboriginal art to reveal what it means to its makers and users and what it can tell us about the societies that produce it. He discusses the paintings (on rock, bark, human bodies and canvas), sculptures, weapons and utensils, from across Australia, bringing out common themes but also highlighting regional diversity. The text is illustrated with outstanding examples, many published here for the first time. The result is a book that reveals the richness and dynamism of the art of one of the world's most enduring cultures.
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Item type Location Collection Call number Copy Status Notes Date due Barcode Item holds
Book Book Main library Non-fiction AUS MOR 1998 (Browse shelf) 1 Available 2013-0280
Book Book Secure book room Non-fiction AUS MOR 1988B (Browse shelf) 2 Not For Loan Donated by Meredithe Madigan | In reserve storage 2014-2106
Book Book Secure book room Non-fiction AUS MOR 1988C (Browse shelf) 3 Not For Loan In ready reserve storage 2016-0334
Book Book Secure book room Non-fiction AUS MOR 1988D (Browse shelf) 4 Not For Loan Donated by Rebecca Murray | In reserve storage 2018-0013
Total holds: 0

Includes index.

Bibliography: pages 434-439.

A journey to recognition: the 'discovery' of Aboriginal art -- A lasting record: rock art as history -- Foundations: art, religion and the Dreaming -- A totemic landscape: art, maps and people -- The kinship of art: art and society -- The power of art: art, ritual and aesthetics -- Engaging the other: art and the survival of Aboriginal society -- Transformations: the contemporary art of central Australia -- Settler Australia: the survival of art in adversity -- Documents of change: the art of William Barak and Tommy McRae -- Contemporary developments: Aboriginal art and the avant-garde.

For thousands of years Australian Aborigines have been making art. A manifestation of the creative forces of the Dreamtime, art is also a means of expressing individual and group identity. But while Aboriginal art keeps the past alive and maintains its relevance to the present, it also responds to new circumstances. Aboriginal art cannot be divorced from the process of European colonization that began in earnest in 1788.

In this book, Howard Morphy, one of the foremost authorities in this field, surveys the great variety of Aboriginal art to reveal what it means to its makers and users and what it can tell us about the societies that produce it. He discusses the paintings (on rock, bark, human bodies and canvas), sculptures, weapons and utensils, from across Australia, bringing out common themes but also highlighting regional diversity. The text is illustrated with outstanding examples, many published here for the first time. The result is a book that reveals the richness and dynamism of the art of one of the world's most enduring cultures.

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