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Farewell to an idea : episodes from a history of modernism /

by Clark, T. J. (Timothy J.) [author].
Type: materialTypeLabelBookDescription: vii, 451 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 29 cm.ISBN: 0300075324 :.Subject(s): Cézanne, Paul, 1839-1906 | Pissarro, Camille, 1830-1903 | Modernism (Art) | Cubism | Abstract expressionism
Contents:
1. Painting in the Year 2 -- 2. We Field-Women -- 3. Freud's Cezanne -- 4. Cubism and Collectivity -- 5. God Is Not Cast Down -- 6. The Unhappy Consciousness -- 7. In Defense of Abstract Expressionism.
Summary: T. J. Clark rewrites the history of modern art. With the fall of the Berlin Wall, he explains, "there is general agreement at present that the project called socialism has come to an end, roughly at the same moment as modernism." Have modernism and socialism died together? And did the two of them depend on each other for life - for their sense of the future, their wish to live in a fully material world? Not flinching from modernism's dangers and blind spots, but passionately attached to the movement's wildness, Clark poses these fundamental questions to the culture and politics of the past two centuries.
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Item type Location Collection Call number Copy Status Notes Date due Barcode Item holds
Book Book Main library Non-fiction PE MOD 1999 (Browse shelf) 1 Available Donated by Terence Maloon 2014-0916
Total holds: 0

Includes bibliographical references and index.

1. Painting in the Year 2 -- 2. We Field-Women -- 3. Freud's Cezanne -- 4. Cubism and Collectivity -- 5. God Is Not Cast Down -- 6. The Unhappy Consciousness -- 7. In Defense of Abstract Expressionism.

T. J. Clark rewrites the history of modern art. With the fall of the Berlin Wall, he explains, "there is general agreement at present that the project called socialism has come to an end, roughly at the same moment as modernism." Have modernism and socialism died together? And did the two of them depend on each other for life - for their sense of the future, their wish to live in a fully material world? Not flinching from modernism's dangers and blind spots, but passionately attached to the movement's wildness, Clark poses these fundamental questions to the culture and politics of the past two centuries.

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