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Drawing in Australia : contemporary images and ideas /

by McKenzie, Janet [author.].
Type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: South Melbourne : Macmillan, 1986Description: xiii, 178 pages : illustrations, portraits ; 29 cm.ISBN: 0333415051.Subject(s): 1900 - 1999 | Drawing | Drawing -- Australia -- 20th century | Drawing, Australian | Drawing | Drawing, Australian -- 20th century | Drawing -- 20th century -- Australia | Drawing, Australian | Australia | Drawing, Australian
Incomplete contents:
Chapter One: The Figure -- Chapter Two: Still Life and Interior -- Chapter Three: Landscape.
Judith Alexandrovics -- Rick Amor -- Irene Barberis -- Tim Bass -- Marion Borgelt -- John Brack -- Godwin Bradbeer -- Jan Brown -- Judy Cassab -- Alice Blanch Chehovski -- Roy Churcher -- Peter Corlett -- Noel Counihan -- Christopher Croft -- Ray Crooke -- Elizabeth Cross -- William Delafield-Cook -- John Dent -- Robert Dickerson -- Brian Dunlop -- Geoffrey Dupree -- Helen Eager -- Janene Eaton -- Fraser Fair -- Donald Friend -- Barbara Grosman -- Pam Hallandal -- George Haynes -- Geoff Hogg -- John Hopkins -- William Kelly -- Les Kossatz -- Kevin Lincoln -- Elwyn Lynn -- Glenys MacIntosh -- Ian Maclean -- Jeffrey Makin -- Suzie Marston -- Mandy Martin -- Maggie May -- Rick McCracken -- Tim McGuire -- Mary McQueen -- Mirka Mora -- Leon Morocco -- Sidney Nolan -- Justin O'Brien -- John Olsen -- Anne Prowse -- Darien Pullen -- Lloyd Rees -- Lisa Roberts -- John Scurry -- Brian Seidel -- Jan Senbergs -- Michael Shannon -- Jeffrey Smart -- Ken Smith -- Constance Stokes -- Tim Storrier -- Guy Stuart -- Noel Thurgate -- Albert Tucker -- Vicki Varvaressos -- John R. Walker -- Robin Wallace-Crabbe -- Brett Whiteley -- John Wolseley Salvatore Zofrea
Summary: In the 1980s many artists, both here and overseas, are choosing a figurative mode of expression. This reflects a commitment to art to make it accessible, to address universal as well as personal concerns.Summary: This book, containing works by seventy Australian artists, shows that modern drawing is often a rigorous and demanding discipline. It covers a broad range of styles - powerful and expressive or poetic and gentle - and subject matter is sometimes intimate, sometimes large-scale, dealing with social and political issues.Summary: Artists such as Lloyd Rees, John Brack, Jeffrey Smart, Noel Counihan and Pam Hallandal, as well as those of a more recent generation, are represented here. Works refer to the studio experience (Brian Dunlop, William Kelly), plein-air drawing (Jan Senbergs, Jeffrey Makin), to television and photographic images (Tim McGuire) to memory (Christopher Croft) and to mythology (Sidney Nolan). They recognize the value of representation in their work, to define perceptions, to express emotions, to formalize highly individual attitudes towards society.Summary: Contemporary art is characterized by great diversiy. The common threads running through this book are both the importance of the outside world, of exterior reality, in the representation of the artists' ideals and also the significance of the act of drawing itself, the most immediate and spontaneous form of graphic expression. This first major Australian survey indicates the variety, the means and the depth of figurative drawing in this country.-- from Book-jacket.
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Includes bibliography (p.172-175) and index.

Chapter One: The Figure -- Chapter Two: Still Life and Interior -- Chapter Three: Landscape.

Judith Alexandrovics -- Rick Amor -- Irene Barberis -- Tim Bass -- Marion Borgelt -- John Brack -- Godwin Bradbeer -- Jan Brown -- Judy Cassab -- Alice Blanch Chehovski -- Roy Churcher -- Peter Corlett -- Noel Counihan -- Christopher Croft -- Ray Crooke -- Elizabeth Cross -- William Delafield-Cook -- John Dent -- Robert Dickerson -- Brian Dunlop -- Geoffrey Dupree -- Helen Eager -- Janene Eaton -- Fraser Fair -- Donald Friend -- Barbara Grosman -- Pam Hallandal -- George Haynes -- Geoff Hogg -- John Hopkins -- William Kelly -- Les Kossatz -- Kevin Lincoln -- Elwyn Lynn -- Glenys MacIntosh -- Ian Maclean -- Jeffrey Makin -- Suzie Marston -- Mandy Martin -- Maggie May -- Rick McCracken -- Tim McGuire -- Mary McQueen -- Mirka Mora -- Leon Morocco -- Sidney Nolan -- Justin O'Brien -- John Olsen -- Anne Prowse -- Darien Pullen -- Lloyd Rees -- Lisa Roberts -- John Scurry -- Brian Seidel -- Jan Senbergs -- Michael Shannon -- Jeffrey Smart -- Ken Smith -- Constance Stokes -- Tim Storrier -- Guy Stuart -- Noel Thurgate -- Albert Tucker -- Vicki Varvaressos -- John R. Walker -- Robin Wallace-Crabbe -- Brett Whiteley -- John Wolseley Salvatore Zofrea

In the 1980s many artists, both here and overseas, are choosing a figurative mode of expression. This reflects a commitment to art to make it accessible, to address universal as well as personal concerns.

This book, containing works by seventy Australian artists, shows that modern drawing is often a rigorous and demanding discipline. It covers a broad range of styles - powerful and expressive or poetic and gentle - and subject matter is sometimes intimate, sometimes large-scale, dealing with social and political issues.

Artists such as Lloyd Rees, John Brack, Jeffrey Smart, Noel Counihan and Pam Hallandal, as well as those of a more recent generation, are represented here. Works refer to the studio experience (Brian Dunlop, William Kelly), plein-air drawing (Jan Senbergs, Jeffrey Makin), to television and photographic images (Tim McGuire) to memory (Christopher Croft) and to mythology (Sidney Nolan). They recognize the value of representation in their work, to define perceptions, to express emotions, to formalize highly individual attitudes towards society.

Contemporary art is characterized by great diversiy. The common threads running through this book are both the importance of the outside world, of exterior reality, in the representation of the artists' ideals and also the significance of the act of drawing itself, the most immediate and spontaneous form of graphic expression. This first major Australian survey indicates the variety, the means and the depth of figurative drawing in this country.-- from Book-jacket.

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